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Improved soil health

We strive to source ingredients from farms with sustainable agriculture practices that improve soil health.

What goes into SOIL HEALTH

Partnering with farms that implement sustainable agriculture practices can help improve and regenerate the soil for future planting and harvests. With your Real Foodprint, you’ll see the square feet of soil that can benefit from these practices with orders like yours.

Calculating Soil Health

Real Foodprint will show you improved soil health as a combination of macro and micro biodiversity, and the impact of your selected ingredients’ impact on soil structure. Acres with improved soil health are those under methods of production that cause less damage.

How we back it up

We partnered with HowGood, an independent research company, with the world’s largest database on food sustainability. They assessed each of our 53 ingredients and compared them to the industry average agricultural impact against five key metrics (reduced carbon emissions, antibiotics avoided, water saved, improved soil health, and supported organic land). For soil health specifically, they also relied on these additional resources for measurement.

European Commission Joint Research Centre European Soil Data Centre (ESDAC) Global Soil Atlas Bioversity International Agrobiodiversity Index United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service

Soil Health

Partnering with farms that implement sustainable agriculture practices can help improve the soil for future planting and harvests. You’ll see how many acres of soil are benefitting from these practices with every order.

THE BIGGEST IMPACT

The switch from traditional to organic farming practices can make a big difference to soil health. For us, these three ingredients contributed most to soil health, listed here in order of their positive impact.

beef

The biggest difference we can make with our cattle on soil health is through rotational grazing—or moving livestock between pastures on a regular basis. Doing so helps maintain grass and soil health over time, and helps keep carbon in the ground and not in the atmosphere. In 2019, 24 million pounds out of the 86 million pounds of beef we sourced was from partners who practice rotational grazing.

our Animal Welfare Standards
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Soybeans (tofu)

It’s no big surprise, but organic growing practices help the health of soil by creating a thriving ecosystem from natural, not synthetic fertilizers which can harm the soil. 100% of the soybeans for tofu that we use in our Sofritas are grown organically.

Our commitment to organic
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Black and Pinto Beans

Beans are more than a staple at Chipotle, they’re an opportunity to make a world of difference. In 2019, we sourced 9.4 million pounds of organic or transitional black and pinto beans.

our sustainability efforts
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Room for Improvement

In 2019, 24 million pounds out of the 86 million pounds of beef we sourced was from partners who practice rotational grazing. Rotationally grazed, grass-fed beef and organic agriculture both have the potential to improve soil health.

Helping Move Farming Forward

As part of our commitment to Cultivate a Better World, we’re partnering with farmers to make the switch from conventional to organic.

Other SOIL HEALTH EFFORTS
We're Making

Calculate your real foodprint

Build your favorite Chipotle entrées in our Real Foodprint order simulator and we’ll show you the impact you’re helping to make when you choose Chipotle.

Get your foodprint
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